Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Biography:

Dr. Thiruchelvam Thanaraj, former Associate Professor, current Research and Education Consultant and R&D Pharmaceutical Professional at Apotex, Inc. Toronto, Canada. He earned his Doctorate degree in Postharvest Technology and Food Analysis at Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, UK whereas Dr. Thanaraj studied the chemometric profiles of biochemical compounds of fruits and vegetables with special emphasise to Sri Lankan mango fruits. He did Master of Philosophy and Bachelor's degrees in Postharvest Technology/Agriculture at PGIA, University of Peradeniya and Eastern University, Sri Lanka, respectively. He received many scholarships and grants, attended a number of international conferences and workshops and presented both oral and poster in Sri Lanka, India, UK, Germany, Turkey, USA and Canada. And also, he published over 30 publications including internationals journals and book chapters.

Abstract:

Cannabis may be legally available in Canada for medical as well as recreational purposes in the future. Though the Senate has just passed the legislation with dozens of amendments, it seems still a lot of home works to be done to bring the bill and related procedures to a right and reliable path acceptable by most of the Canadian residents. Back and forth discussions, voting and amendments on the bill is going on between the Senate and House of Common. Therefore, no updated facts of the legislation and its proposed amendments officially available to public yet. However, it is expected the legalization and its subsequent public use of recreational cannabis will definitely face a lot of challenges in terms of implementation and monitoring. In the meantime, legalization of medical cannabis may not get much public attention as it will be beneficial to the globe as a whole, and also it will provide a passage to researchers and scientist to explore more on the plant and its benefits in detail.

So far cannabis is known among Canadian as one of the illegal drugs, which was said to relief pain and anxiety for those in need. Canada, especially Ontario is a very diverse multicultural place, very traditional to well westernised people are living here. Therefore, definitely there is a mix feeling and opinion among people on this effort of the Canadian government. But, it seems the motive of the government is to eliminate the illegal (black) cannabis market, regularise its usage and turning down billions of dollar profits towards both provincial and federal government which goes to illegal dealers.

However, those who well understood the pros and cons of this plant, its impact on the community, medical and health benefits and future focus on pharmaceutical industry need to think generously whilst keeping in mind of all possible present and future issues once it is legalized in Canada. Having said that there is a necessity to implement novel food processing, extraction and preservation technologies to diminish the psychoactive properties of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), especially in recreational marijuana. In the meantime, initiate positive steps to explore hundreds of valuable biochemical components of this plant including THC and Cannabidiol (CBD), which is expected to have some exceptional health benefits. Furthermore, advanced and continuous research is needed to explore and dissect cannabis plant, its components, benefits and impacts in detail. Positive thinking and approach are key in this issue, if cannabis is legalised and arrived in front of public, it is better to find out the possible ways and means to utilize this valuable plant to its optimum in meaningful ways with minimum impact to the public safety; rather than criticising, protesting or misusing it hence these activities may cause negative impact.

Keynote Forum

Mohamed Fawzy Ramadan Hassanien

Professor Zagazig University Egypt

Keynote: Composition and functionality of selected cold-pressed oils

Time : 10:40 AM-11:20 AM

Biography:

Prof. Mohamed Fawzy Ramadan Hassanien is a Professor of Biochemistry at Zagazig University (Egypt). Currently he is a Professor at Umm Al-Qura University (KSA). Prof. Hassanien obtained his PhD (2004) in Food Chemistry from Berlin University of Technology (Germany). Prof. Hassanien continued his research in ranked universities in different countries such Finland and USA. In 2012, he appointed as a visiting Professor in School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University (Vladivostok, Russia). Prof. Hassanien published more than 180 articles and reviews in international journals with high IF as well as several books (Scopus h-index is 30).

Abstract:

Cold-pressed oils (CPO) found in the market were studied for their lipid classes, fatty acid profile, tocols and phenolics contents. Radical scavenging potential against DPPH· and galvinoxyl radicals were determined. Antimicrobial properties of CPO against foodborne bacteria, food spoilage fungi and dermatophyte fungi were also evaluated. The level of neutral lipids in CPO was the highest, followed by glycolipids and phospholipids. The main fatty acids in the most of CPO were linoleic, oleic, stearic and palmitic acids. Tocols and phenolic compounds were determined at high levels. CPO exhibited strong antiradical action and antioxidant traits as evaluated using Rancimat assay. Some CPO inhibited the growth of all tested microorganisms including food spoilage fungi (A. flavus and C. albi) and dermatophyte fungi (T. mentagrophytes and T. rubrum). CPO exhibited also broad-spectra activity against food-borne pathogen bacteria (S. aureusE. coli, S. enteritidis and L. Monocytogenes) with MIC ranging between 160 to 320 μg/mL. The results suggest that Saudi CPO could be used economically as a valuable natural product with novel functional properties in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. 

 

Biography:

Professor Adegoke obtained his PhD degree (Veterinary Microbiology) in 1984 from the University of Ibadan, Nigeria and is a full Professor in the Department of Food Technology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. Prof Adegoke is a recipient of scholarships and fellowships from the governments of Nigeria, Belgium, France, Germany, Japan, Finland and Canada. Prof Adegoke has taught in universities in Zambia, Kenya, South Africa and Lesotho and Nigeria. Professor Adegoke was invited as a Consultant by the World Health Organization (WHO)  in 1996, 1999, 2002 and 2007 on issues relating to Healthy Food  Market, acrylamide and food safety( FERG). Professor Adegoke is currently a member of FAO's JECFA on food additives, contaminants and natural toxicants . Professor Adegoke is an online reviewer for several professional journals and he is on the Editorial Boards of The African Journal of Food, Agriculture and Development (AJFAND) and some other international journals with reasonable impact factors. He is the Editor-in-Chief, Current Bacteriology (USA). Professor Adegoke's competencies are in the areas of food safety, food additives and microbial toxicants particularly fungal toxins .

Abstract:

Aframomum danielli , ginger, garlic and turmeric  belong to the family Zingiberaceae.  In addition to flavouring ,   some spices have been found to possess anti-oxidative, anti-mutagenic and preservative properties.  Spices which are of commercial importance have  invariably attracted considerable attention.    Not much is known about the spice A. danielli   therefore combining  food chemistry and food microbiology  data  can  be useful  to highlight the commercial potentials of the spice.

Standard methods were used for the extraction and characterization of essential oil from A. danielli, mitigation of mycotoxins, control of sprouting in yam and enzymes associated with liver dysfunction(animal assay) .  The antioxidant effectiveness, control of food spoilage pathogens and preservative potentials of A.danielli were also evaluated using standard procedures.

Eucalyptol (58%),  β-Pinene oxide (22%) and other terpenes were present as volatile organic compounds in  A.danielli.  Essential oil (500 to 3000 ppm)  of A.danielli  had 50 -100% reduction efficiency (RE) of ochratoxin A in spiked cocoa powder and 76% (RE) in fuminosin B in an non-alcoholic beverage

(kunu zaki).  With control yam (Dioscorea rotundata) having a sprouting index of 25% (10 min) , samples of yam treated with A.danielli at 5%, 10% and 15% had sprouting indices of 4.4%, 2.25% and 2.22% (10 min) respectively.  Feeding   albino rats (100-200 mg/kg) with  ground powder of  A. danielli , serum enzyme levels of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were lowered by 67%, 86.3%, and 49.7% respectively when compared with control rats. Using refined peanut oil, antioxidant effectiveness of A.danielli  (87.3%) was higher than tert-butyl hydroquinone (83.4%) and  butylated hydroxytoluene (79.6%) respectively  at 65 ± 10 C. Broad spectrum antimicrobial activities against food borne pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes, Aspergillus flavus and   A.ochraceus.  Maize and soybeans treated with ground A.danielli powder with storage under ambient conditions (26 ± 1 0 C ; RH 75 ±5 %) for 15 months showed no mouldiness and insect infestation.

With data obtained on the spice A.danielli, the unique properties of the spice can be exploited for industrial applications .  

  • FOOD ANALYSIS AND QUALITY CONTROL

Session Introduction

Robert Weil

Kansas State University USA

Title: Generating biogas and recovering other resources from food processing wastes
Speaker
Biography:

A civil engineering graduate of the US Coast Guard Academy, Robert practiced in the field of public works and city engineering for 30 years, primarily in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. Robert retired from municipal service as the Public Works Director/City Engineer of the City of San Carlos, California in 2011.  Having a desire to learn more about water and wastewater treatment, he then completed technical courses and worked as a water treatment plant operator, both in California and Kansas.  In 2017, Robert started his graduate studies at Kansas State University’s civil engineering program, where he is a student of Dr. Prathap Paramaswaran, a leading researcher in the field of anaerobic digestion, or AD.  Robert is researching how AD could be used as for pretreatment of agro-industrial wastes in Kansas, as it has the potential to cost-effectively reduce loading on municipal plants, generate renewable energy, conserve water, and recover nutrients.  He expects to complete his master’s degree in December 2018 and has been accepted to Kansas State’s PhD program.  He intends to complete a portion of his PhD studies abroad in Thailand, at Kasetsart  University’s Fermentation Technology Research Center. Ultimately, Robert hopes to continue his contributions to the profession of civil engineering through teaching, research, and commercialization of new treatment technologies.  Robert is a registered professional engineer in California and Kansas and is a Grade IV water treatment plant operator in Kansas.

Abstract:

Food processing wastes tend to be high in chemical and organic demand, imposing an environmental and financial burden on those responsible for generating the waste. Many food industries incur costly charges for treating food wastes off-site. The industries also face financial liability and potential shutdown if the downstream wastewater treatment plants become overloaded. Conventional aerobic treatment of wastewater is energy-intensive and emits greenhouse gases in large quantities. On the other hand, anaerobic pre-treatment of food wastes on site can generate renewable energy, conserve water, and recover nutrients for the food industry, all while benefitting the environment.  Anaerobic wastewater treatment has the effect of taking greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere.  The presentation, by Robert Weil, PE, a Kansas State University graduate student, will include an overview of this technology for food processing wastes, international trends, and case studies involving a meat packing plant and the university’s own wastewaters, as well as an economic analysis for each case study.  Regional data regarding the potential for resource recovery from this pretreatment approach will be presented, as well as an analysis of barriers and constraints. 

  • Food and Food Chemistry
Speaker
Biography:

Wanphen Weil earned a bachelor’s degree in biotechnology from Rajamangala University of Technology, followed by a master's degree in biotechnology from Kasetsart University in 2002. For three years after this, she conducted research at the Thailand Cassava and Starch Research Laboratory. After 6 years of experience as an industrial QA manager, she decided to return to the research world, again with the Thailand Cassava and Starch Research Laboratory.  During this time, she also started her own business, which manufactured newborn products from 100% cotton. In 2015, she started the PhD program at Kasetsart University, working with Dr. Klanarong Sriroth.  She currently is researching as a visiting scholar in the laboratory of Dr. Yong-Cheng Shi in the Department of Grain Science and Industry at Kansas State University. Her current research projects involve the properties of starch from the cassava plant as well as using buckwheat for gluten-free noodles.

Abstract:

Tapioca (Manihot escualenta Crantz), also referred to as cassava, mandioca, manioc, or yuca, is a woody shrub originating from South America, which is mainly cultivated for its tuberous, carbohydrate-rich roots.  Normal tapioca is high in rapidly digestible starch, thus foods prepared with normal tapioca have a high glycemic index, which is implicated in obesity, Type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.  Also, normal tapioca contributes little to dietary fiber intake, which is vital to human health.  Soluble dietary fiber is especially important in the human diet because of its contributions to bacterial health in the large intestines.  In 2007, the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), identified a new variety of tapioca, “waxy” tapioca. The waxy tapioca starch variety differs from normal tapioca in its molecular structure, in that it is amylose-free.  Previous studies have used pyrodextrinization to modify starch and increase soluble dietary fiber content.  In this study, systematic experiments were completed to measure various physico-chemical properties of the new waxy tapioca starch as well as normal tapioca starch, in unmodified form as well as at various levels of pyrodextrinization.  Unmodified waxy tapioca starch was found to pyrodextrinize at lower levels of time and temperature than normal tapioca starch. Unmodified tapioca starch and its pyrodextrins were found to have higher transmittance and stability after boiling and cooling, to show less retrogradation, to have more of a canary color, and to attain higher dietary fiber content than normal tapioca starch and its pyrodextrins.  

Waxy tapioca starch had higher levels of low molecular weight soluble fiber than normal (41.7% v. 35.4%) at the highest level of pyrodextrinization (170oC, 4h). Future research should focus on using waxy tapioca starch and its pyrodextrins as a food ingredient with excellent clarity and stability, low glycemic index and a high fraction of soluble dietary fiber..

 

  • Recent Innovation in Food Chemistry
Speaker
Biography:

Lina Marcela Suarez Restrepo is a food engineer graduated from the University of Antioquia, where she currently holds doctoral studies in pharmaceutical and food sciences. His research has been in the search for biofunctional compounds of extracts and plant protein hydrolysates.

Abstract:

The cassava (Manihot esculenta crantz) production industry generates a large quantity of by-products, among which are the leaves, which reach 49 million tons worldwide. These leaves can be consumed by humans and animals because of their high protein content (18 and 38%), however they have low utilization due to the lack of technical and scientific information. Its high protein content makes it a substrate of interest for enzymatic hydrolysis and the search for bioactive peptides, with potential use in the food industry. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: the cassava leaves were dried (T = 50 °C, t = 6 h) and ground before the hydrolysis process. This process was carried out by means of the pH-Stat method, at 50 ° C, enzyme / substrate ratio [E: S]: 0.07 und / g protein, for 2 h. The enzymes used were Alcalase 2.4L (pH: 9.0), Nuetrase 0.8L (pH: 7.0), Protamex (pH: 8.0) and Flovourzyme (pH: 8.0). The extraction efficiency of protein (E,%), the degree of hydrolysis (GH,%), the antioxidant activity by the ABTS°+, FRAP, ORAC and Crocin methods were analyzed. Findings: the enzymes Alcalasa 2.4L and Protamex did not present statistically significant differences in GH, but E was higher in the hydrolysis performed with Alcalasa 2.4 L (50,4%), also showed higher antioxidant activity measured by the transfer methods of electrons (ABTS°+ and FRAP), but for the hydrogen atom transfer methods (Crocin and ORAC) the Neutrase 0.8L and Protamex did not show statistically significant differences. Conclusion & Significance: It is possible to obtain protein hydrolysates cassava leaves with high antioxidant activity with protease enzymes such as Alcalase 2.4L, Neutrase 0.8L, Flavourzyme and Protamex.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Leidy Maritza Sierra Lopera received the Bs. Eng in Biological Engineering in 2007, the MSc degree in Science and Food Technology 2012, all of them from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia-Medellin Campus. Since 2009 she has been Part Time Professor in Universidad Nacional de Colombia-Medellin and she is a Ph.D student in Universidad de Antioquia. Her research interests include: food processing and food biotechnology.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The red tilapia scales (Oreochromis sp.) is an important waste of the processing of this fish and its contained of protein is near of 29%, which can be used to obtain peptides with biological activity. For its extraction it is possible to use enzymatic hydrolysis with different proteases such as alcalase and flavourzyme. The objective of this work is to compare the enzymes alcalase and flavourzyme in the peptides extraction from red tilapia scales (Oreochromis sp.) with antioxidant and iron chelating potential. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The red tilapia scales (Oreochromis sp.) were washed with hypochlorite 0.2 mg/L and then stored at -20 ° C until processing, later they were dried and mixed. An experimental design of response surface (DOE) was carried out, central composed with the factors temperature and pH to search the optimal conditions for each enzyme. The response variables were: protein (g / L) and degree hydrolysis GH (%). The hydrolysis time was 3 hours with constant agitation in a 500 mL reactor and substrate concentration was 8 g/L of protein. Findings: Significant models were obtained for the variables evaluated and it was observed that the optimal conditions of pH/temperature were 8.5/58.5°C and 7.56/53.5 for alcalase and flavourzyme respectively. For variable GH was obtained that the hydrolysis process had 17% for alcalase and 6% for flavourzyme. Besides the percentages of protein extraction were 84% for alcalase meanwhile 46% for flavourzyme. On the optimal conditions were evaluated the bioactivities, alcalase is more productive than flavourzyme due to it´s possible obtain 107 (µM ET/gr*mL alcalase) in comparation with 54 (µM ET/gr*mL flavourzyme), in iron quelating potential is similar for two enzymes. Conclusion & Significance: hydrolysis performed with alcalase is more convenient to obtain hydrolysates with bioactivity from scale fish of red tilapia (Oreochromis sp.).